Category Archives: Style in film

Very, Very Natural and Herself: Katharine Hepburn in “Bringing Up Baby”

Is Katharine Hepburn playing herself in Bringing Up Baby? And if so, why not? Katharine Hepburn turned Hollywood on its head. She fearlessly and uncompromisingly set out to become a star in an industry that wanted greatness on its own terms. She wanted greatness on her own unconventional terms, and she became the reluctant and the most natural movie star. So why wouldn’t she play some version of herself in at least some of her movies? Read More

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Anny Romand in “Diva”: An Agnès B. Kind of Sensibility

Anny Romand and Jean-Jacques Moreau in “Diva”, 1981. Les Films Galaxie, Greenwich Film Productions, France 2   We go to different films for different reasons, Roger Ebert once said. And, of course, we love each film for different reasons. Jean-Jacques … Read More

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Romy Schneider in “Innocents with Dirty Hands”: A Study in Black Yves Saint Laurent

Romy Schneider in “Innocents with Dirty Hands”, 1975. Jupiter Generale Cinematografica, Les Films de la Boétie, Terra-Filmkunst   Romy Schneider is glorious in Les innocents aux mains sales. And although this article will mainly cover the role her Yves Saint … Read More

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Tallulah Bankhead in Lifeboat, from Jaded Sophisticate to Humane Survivor

A solitary and impeccably dressed Tallulah Bankhead appearing in a lifeboat surrounded by fog opens Hitchcock’s Lifeboat. She remains impassive as drifting survivors from a ship attacked by a German U-boat start to fill the lifeboat. She is one of the most self-sufficient and independent of Hitchcock heroines and one of my personal favourites. Read More

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Mickey Rourke in Angel Heart: Dressed to Fit the Monochromatic Look and Distressed Reality of a 1955 Noir

It also makes perfect sense that Mickey Rourke would play Harry Angel. Not only does Rourke’s presence lend absolute conviction to the film’s generic roots of early 1950s noir, but his disheveled appearance combined with his emotionally vulnerable screen performance alluded to a Read More

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